Carbon 14 dating artifacts

08 Feb

Stratigraphy Inspired by geology, stratigraphy uses the principle of the superposition of strata which suggests that, in a succession of undisturbed SOILS, the upper horizons are newer than the lower ones.

This technique is frequently used when it is impossible to make use of absolute dating methods; it generally allows archaeologists to identify the period to which a cultural site or object belongs, without specifying the date of occupation.

This method is primarily applied to projectile points and ceramic vessels.

Libby invented carbon dating for which he received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1960.

The halflife of carbon 14 is 5730 ± 30 years, and the method of dating lies in trying to determine how much carbon 14 (the radioactive isotope of carbon) is present in the artifact and comparing it to levels currently present in the atmosphere.

Archaeologists have access to various techniques for dating archaeological sites or the objects found on those sites.

There are two main categories of dating methods in archaeology: indirect or relative dating and absolute dating.